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It's 1954 in the cozy, New England town of Twin Oaks. Murder is on the menu. Can Izzy Walsh help find the culinary killer?

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Eve Lazarus, Murder by Milkshake, Arsenal Pulp Press

In 1965, radio personality Rene Castellani poisoned his wife Esther with arsenic flavoured milkshakes so he could marry Lolly.

Bell HearingVoices

E.C. Bell, Hearing Voices, Tyche Books

Marie wants the nightmares to stop. Doesn’t look like that's going to happen anytime soon.

Whishaw SorrowfulSanctuary

Iona Whishaw, A Sorrowful Sanctuary, TouchWood Editions

When Lane Winslow finds a badly injured man in a rowboat, she gets a shocking reminder of the perils of the recent war.

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Wilson WildDogsofMexico

T.E. Wilson, Wild Dogs of Mexico, Boularderie Island Press

Detective Sánchez investigates the Catholic Church in the desert city of Durango, and offers himself as the final sacrifice.

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Melissa Yi, Death Flight, Windtree Press

A doctor trapped on a plane with a killer battles to save lives—and wonders if she herself might be the murderer.

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Martin DarkestBeforeDawn

Mike Martin, Darkest Before the Dawn, Ottawa Press and Publishing

Darkest Before the Dawn is the latest adventure of Sgt. Winston Windflower, a Mountie who finds himself surrounded by a new family and a new life in tiny Grand Bank, Newfoundland.

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T.E. Wilson, Wild Dogs of Mexico, Boularderie Island Press

A former aid worker stumbles into the world of exploited foreign workers when she rescues a Filipino nanny accused of murder.

Penz Sheluk PastandPresent

Judy Penz Sheluk, Past & Present, Superior Shores Press

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Unhanged Arthur Ellis Award

The Unhanged Arthur Ellis Award

for Best Unpublished First Crime Novel

Sponsored by Dundurn Press

The first Unhanged Arthur was awarded by the Crime Writers of Canada in 2007 as part of the CWC mandate to recognize and promote the careers of promising new crime writers.

The competition is open to (1) Canadian citizens, no matter where they are living, and to writers, regardless of nationality, who have Permanent Resident status in Canada, and (2) who have never had a novel of any kind published commercially.  

Contestants must have a completed novel manuscript (50,000-110,000 words) at the time of entry.

Click here to read the submission guidelines. These are updated every year by September 1st.

Click here for our Unhanged Arthur Style Guide .

 

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Unhanged Arthur Style Guide

In case this is the first writing competition you've entered (or even if you're an old hand at the game), information and RULES follow on how to format and present your submission and how to write a synopsis.

The Unhanged Arthur Ellis Award

for Best Unpublished Crime Manuscript
Sponsored by Dundurn Press

STYLE GUIDE

This page addresses various issues to do with formatting and presentation.

There are a few official rules to do with presentation.

  • Entries must be typed.
  • The title of the entry – but NOT your name – must be on each page of your submission.
  • Pages must be numbered.
  • Use either 12-point Times New Roman or 12-point Courier.
  • Use single line spacing.
  • Margins should be 1 inch
  • Paper size should be 8.5 X 11 inch paper or A4.
  • Print on one side of the page only.

IGNORING THESE RULES MAY DISQUALIFY THE ENTRY.

Beyond these rules, however, there are all sorts of presentation elements which won't disqualify you if you get them wrong, but will which make it much easier for the judges to read and enjoy your work if they are used.

Formatting and Layout

The best way to format text for fiction, used in just about every novel ever published, is as follows:

  • Start new paragraphs with an indented first line.
  • Don't use blank lines between consecutive paragraphs.
  • Do use a blank line or three asterisks to show a break between scenes or a break in the flow of the narrative.
  • Start new chapters on a new page.
  • Use a new paragraph each time a different character starts to speak.

Spelling

  • Check your spelling meticulously.
  • Beware malapropisms and homonyms; words can be spelled correctly and still be terribly wrong. Some examples include a particularly 'viscous murder,' a 'burlesque policeman,' and – in a supermarket – an 'isle of chips.' Do not rely solely on your computer's spell-checker.

Punctuation

Punctuation can be a bit of a minefield, and many of the rules are unclear. Three things in particular to beware of are:

  • Apostrophes: It's a shame that many people can't put an apostrophe in its proper place. 'It's' is a contraction of 'it is'; 'its' shows that something belongs to 'it' (whatever 'it' may be). Apostrophes should never be used for plurals – no 'bag's of orange's.
  • Quotation marks: Always use quotation marks around speech. Standard North American usage is to use the “double quote.”
  • Exclamation marks! Try not to use exclamation marks. If a sentence is witty, funny, or dramatic, the reader will notice anyway. If it's not, you won't make things better by drawing attention to it.

The Synopsis

For many entrants, writing the required synopsis may be more daunting and difficult than writing the initial 10,000 words of their novel. You are not alone. Experienced and published writers balk in exactly the same way that you do when faced with writing one.

  1. The synopsis should be of the entire book.

  2. Use the same narrative style that you use in the book; if the book is 'chatty' don't change to formal in the synopsis.

  3. Be clear. Show plot movements in order, introduce new characters as they appear, if they are major characters show us the 'why' of their actions as well as the 'what'.

  4. Never offer meaningless sentences such as: “Something dreadful was about to happen.” or “What happened next would devastate him.”

  5. Show how sub-plots interlink with the main plot and its characters.

  6. Do not include physical descriptions unless it is absolutely essential.

  7. A synopsis is always written in present tense, never past.

These pages incorporate material written by Michael Jecks, Kay Mitchell, and Edwin Thomas, members of the CWA who have coordinated the Debut Dagger Awards.

We thank Margaret Murphy and the Crime Writers Association of Great Britain for their generosity in allowing us to adapt material from their Debut Dagger Award Website in describing the Arthur Ellis Award for Best Unpublished First Crime Novel.

And thank you to Louise Penny and Michael Whiteside for the original adaptation of the CWA rules to use for the Unhanged Arthur.

 

Submission Rules for The Unhanged Arthur Ellis Award
for Best Unpublished Crime Manuscript

Unhanged Arthur Online Entry Form (For entering online with the choice of online payment or cheque.)

Printable entry Form for "Unhanged Arthur" (For people who don't like online forms.)

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