Fritze CrooksHill

Peter Fritze, Crook's Hill, Peter Fritze

Alan Boltby yearns to be more than a workaholic lawyer. Confronted by insider trading, unexplained deaths and blame for a sordid family secret, he turns investigator.

Ace UnsuitableSuitor

Cathy Ace, The Case of the Unsuitable Suitor, Severn House Publishers

When the Welsh village of Anwen's prodigal son, Huw Hughes, returns and sets his cap at Annie Parker, village publican Tudor begs Annie's colleagues at the WISE Enquiries Agency to unearth the truth behind Huw having been widowed three times.

Bolton Fritters

Ginger Bolton, Survival of the Fritters, Kensington Publishing

Emily Westhill runs the best donut shop in Fallingbrook, Wisconsin, alongside her retired police chief father-in-law and her tabby Deputy Donut.

Kellough BathwaterConspiracy

Janet Kellough, The Bathwater Conspiracy, EDGE Science Fiction and Fantasy

A nasty woman's answer to The Handmaid's Tale.

Delany CatoftheBaskervilles

Vicki Delany, The Cat of the Baskervilles, Crooked Lane Books

The game is once again afoot at the Sherlock Holmes Bookshop and Emporium

Koetting TripleThreat

Alexis Koetting, Triple Threat, Iguana Books

The second Bella James Mystery, filled with new and familiar characters who will make you laugh, cry, and keep you guessing until the very end.

Campbell B Team

Melodie Campbell, The B-Team, Orca Books

They do wrong for all the right reasons. And sometimes it even works...

Wright, Eric

Wright EricWright, Eric

Born 1929, London UK. Died 2016, Canada.

If there ever was a crime writer whom the Canadian crime-writing community needs to thank it is Eric Wright.

Eric Wright wrote eighteen crime novels, in four different series, as well as novels, a novella, and a memoir. Eric’s first novel, The Night the Gods Smiled (1983), won the first Arthur Ellis Award for Best Crime Novel, the John Creasey Award from the Crime Writers’ Association (CWA), and the City of Toronto Book Award. The Kidnapping of Rosie Dawn (2000) won an Arthur and was nominated for an Edgar from the Mystery Writers of America (MWA).

His writing career spanned over forty years and his contribution to Canadian crime writing was, without question, immense. This was recognized in 1998 when Eric received the Derrick Murdoch Award for lifetime contribution to Canadian crime writing.

Eric Wright passed away in October, 2015, shortly after being notified that he had been selected for the Grand Master Award. Eric continued writing until shortly before his death, and in May 2016, Cormorant Books released The Land Mine, a historical novel loosely based on Eric’s own childhood in World War II London.

 

"With his detective Charlie Salter, novelist Eric Wright created one of the country’s most popular literary heroes. Much like Salter doggedly working a case, Mr. Wright was known for meticulously crafting the plots of his crime novels, which were always readable and quintessentially Canadian."

Globe and Mail

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