Arthur Ellis Awards

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Arthur Ellis Award Winners 1984-2005

  Arthur Ellis Award Winners

1984-2005

 

1990 1995 2000

 

1984

Best Novel: Eric Wright, The Night the Gods Smiled (Scribner's: New York, 1983)


1985

Best Novel: Howard Engel, Murder Sees the Light (St. Martin's: New York, 1984)

Best Nonfiction: Martin Friedland, The Trials of Israel Lipsky (Beaufort: New York, 1984)


1986

Best Novel: Eric Wright, Death in the Old Country (Scribner's: New York, 1985)

Best Nonfiction: Maggie Siggins, A Canadian Tragedy (McClelland & Stewart: Toronto, 1985)


1987

Best Novel: Edward O. Phillips, Buried on Sunday (McClelland & Stewart: Toronto, 1986)

Best First Novel: Medora Sale, Murder on the Run (PaperJacks: Toronto, 1986)

Best Nonfiction: Elliott Leyton, Hunting Humans (McClelland & Stewart: Toronto, 1986)


1988

Best Novel: Carol Shields, Swann: A Mystery (Viking: Toronto, 1987)

Best First Novel: Laurence Gough, The Goldfish Bowl (Gollancz: London, 1987)

Best Short Story: Eric Wright, "Looking For an Honest Man" in Cold Blood (Mosaic Press: Oakville, ON, 1987)

Best Nonfiction: Gary Ross, Stung: The Incredible Obsession of Brian Moloney (McClelland & Stewart:
Toronto, 1987)


1989

Best Novel: Chris Scott, Jack (Macmillan: Toronto, 1988)

Best First Novel: John Brady, A Stone of the Heart (Collins: Toronto, 1988)

Best Short Story: Jas. R. Petrin, "Killer in the House", in Alfred Hitchcock Mystery Magazine, 1988

Best Nonfiction: Mick Lowe, Conspiracy of Brothers (Macmillan of Canada: Toronto, 1988)

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1990

Best Novel: Laurence Gough, Hot Shots (Gollancz: London, 1989)

Best First Novel: John Lawrence Reynolds, The Man Who Murdered God (Viking: Toronto, 1989)

Best Short Story: Josef Skvorecky, "Humbug" in The End of Lieutenant Boruvka (Lester & Orpen Dennys: Toronto, 1989)

Best Nonfiction: Lisa Priest, Conspiracy of Silence (McClelland & Stewart: Toronto, 1989)


1991

Best Novel: L.R. Wright, A Chill Rain in January (Macmillan: Toronto, 1990)

Best First Novel: Carsten Stroud, Sniper's Moon (Viking Penguin: Toronto, 1990)

Best Short Story: Peter Robinson, "Innocence" in Cold Blood III (Mosaic Press: Oakville, ON, 1990)

Best Nonfiction: Susan Mayse, Ginger: The Life and Death of Albert Goodwin (Harbour: Madiera Park,
BC, 1990)

Best Criticism/Reference: Donald A. Redmond, Sherlock Holmes Among the Pirates: Copyright and Conan Doyle in America (Greenwood Press: Westport, CT, 1990)


1992

Best Novel: Peter Robinson, Past Reason Hated (Viking Penguin: Toronto, 1991)

Best First Novel: Paul Grescoe, Flesh Wound (Douglas & McIntyre: Vancouver, 1991)

Best Short Story: Eric Wright, "Two in the Bush" in Christmas Stalkings (Mysterious Press: New York, 1991)

Best Nonfiction: William Lowther, Arms and the Man: Dr Gerald Bull, Iraq and the Supergun (Doubleday Canada: Toronto, 1991)

Best Criticism/Reference: Wesley A. Wark, Spy Fiction: Spy Films and Real Intelligence (Frank Cass:
London, 1991)


1993

Best Novel: Carsten Stroud, Lizardskin (Bantam: New York, 1992)

Best First Novel: Sean Stewart, Passion Play (Beach Holme: Victoria, BC, 1992)

Best Short Story: Nancy Kilpatrick, "Mantrap" in Murder, Mayhem and the Macabre (Mississauga Arts Council: Mississauga, ON, 1992)

Best Nonfiction: Kirk Makin, Redrum the Innocent (Viking Penguin: Toronto, 1992)


1994

Best Novel: John Lawrence Reynolds, Gypsy Sins (HarperCollins: Toronto, 1993)

Best First Novel: Gavin Scott, Memory Trace (Cormorant: Dunvegan, ON, 1993)

Best Short Story: Robert J. Sawyer, "Just Like Old Times" in On Spec: The Canadian Magazine of Speculative Writing, Vo1. 5, No.2, 1993

Best Juvenile/YA: John Dowd, Abalone Summer (Raincoast: Vancouver, 1993)

Best Nonfiction: David R. Williams, With Malice Aforethought (Sono Nis: Victoria, BC, 1993)

Best Play: Timothy Findley, The Stillborn Lover (Blizzard: Winnipeg, 1993)

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1995

Best Novel: Gail Bowen, A Colder Kind Of Death (McClelland & Stewart: Toronto, 1994)

Best First Novel: Sparkle Hayter, What's A Girl Gotta Do? (Soho Press: New York, 1994)

Best Short Story: Rosemary Aubert, "The Midnight Boat To Palermo" in Cold Blood V (Mosaic Press, Oakville,
ON, 1994)

Best Juvenile/YA: James Heneghan, Torn Away (Viking: Toronto, 1994)

Best Nonfiction: Michael Harris, The Prodigal Husband (McClelland & Stewart: Toronto, 1994)


1996

Best Novel: L R. Wright, Mother Love (Doubleday: Toronto, 1995)

Best First Novel: (Tie) John Spencer Hill, The Last Castrato (Constable: London, 1995)

D.H. Toole, Moonlit Days and Nights (Cormorant: Dunvegan, ON, 1995)

Best Short Story: Mary Jane Maffini, "Cotton Armour" in The Ladies' Killing Circle (General Store: Burnstown, ON, 1995)

Best Juvenile/YA: Norah McClintock, Mistaken Identity (Scholastic: Richmond Hill, ON, 1995)

Best Nonfiction: Lois Simmie, The Secret Lives of Sgt. John Wilson (Greystone Books: Vancouver, 1995)


1997

Best Novel: Peter Robinson, Innocent Graves (Viking: Toronto, 1996)

Best First Novel: C. C Benison, Death At Buckingham Palace (Bantam: New York, 1996)

Best Short Story: Richard K. Bercuson, "Dead Run" in Storyteller, Winter Issue, 1996

Best Juvenile/YA: Linda Bailey, How Can A Frozen Detective Stay Hot On The Trail? (Kids Can Press:
Toronto, 1996)

Best Nonfiction: Jean Monet, The Cassock And the Crown (McGill/Queen's University Press:
Montreal/Kingston, 1996)


1998

Best Novel: William Deverell, Trial of Passion (McClelland & Stewart: Toronto, 1997)

Best First Novel: Kathy Reichs, Déja Dead (Scribner's: New York, 1997)

Best Short Story: Sue Pike, "Widow's Weeds" in Cottage Country Killers (General Store Publishing House: Ottawa, 1997)

Best Juvenile/YA: Norah McClintock, The Body in the Basement (Scholastic: Toronto, 1997)       

Best Nonfiction: Patricia Pearson, When She was Bad (Random House: Toronto, 1997)


1999

Best Novel: Nora Kelly, Old Wounds (HarperCollins: Toronto, 1998)

Best First Novel: Liz Brady, Sudden Blow (Second Story Press: Toronto, 1998)

Best Short Story: Scott Mackay, "Last Inning" in Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine, 1998

Best Juvenile/YA: Norah McClintock, Sins of the Father (Scholastic: Toronto, 1998)

Best Nonfiction: Derek Finkle, No Claim to Mercy (Penguin: Toronto, 1998)

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2000

Best Novel: Rosemary Aubert, The Feast of Stephen (BridgeWorks Publishing: Toronto, 1999)

Best First Novel: Andrew Pyper, Lost Girls (HarperCollinsCanada: Toronto, 1999)

Best Short Story: Matt Hughes, “One More Kill” in Blue Murder Magazine, 1999

Best French: Lionel Noël, Louna (Éditions de Beaumont: Montréal, QC 1999)

Best Juvenile/YA: Linda Bailey, How Can a Brilliant Detective Shine in the Dark? (Kids Can Press:
Toronto, 1999)

Best Nonfiction: Gordon Sinclair, Jr., Cowboys and Indians (McClelland & Stewart: Toronto, 1999)


2001

Best Novel: Peter Robinson, Cold Is the Grave (Penguin Canada: Toronto, 2000)

Best First Novel: Mark Zuehlke, Hands Like Clouds (Dundurn Group: Toronto, 2000)

Best Short Story: Peter Robinson, “Murder in Utopia” in Crime through Time III (Berkley Prime Crime:
New York, 2000)

Best French: Norbert Spehner, Le roman policier en Amérique française (Éditions Alire: Québec, 2000)

Best Juvenile/YA: Tim Wynne-Jones, The Boy in the Burning House (Groundwood Books: Toronto, 2000)

Best Nonfiction: A.B. McKillop, The Spinster and the Prophet (Macfarlane Walter & Ross: Toronto, 2000)


2002

Best Novel: Michelle Spring, In the Midnight Hour (Ballantine: New York, 2001)

Best First Novel: Jon Redfern, The Boy Must Die (ECW Press: Toronto, 2001)

Best Short Story: Mary Jane Maffini, “Sign of the Times” in Fit to Die (RendezVous Press: Toronto, 2001)

Best French: Anne-Michèle Lévesque, Fleur Invitait au Troisième (Vents d’Ouest: Gatineau, QC 2001)

Best Juvenile/YA: Norah McClintock, Scared to Death (Scholastic Canada: Toronto, 2001)

Best Nonfiction: (Tie) Stevie Cameron & Harvey Cashore, The Last Amigo (Macfarlane Walter & Ross: Toronto, 2001) and Andrew Nikiforuk, Saboteurs (Macfarlane Walter & Ross: Toronto, 2001)

 


 

2003

Best Novel: Rick Mofina, Blood of Others (Kensington Publishing: New York, 2002)

Best First Novel: James W. Nichol, Midnight Cab (Knopf Canada: Toronto, 2002)

Best Short Story: James Powell, “Bottom Walker” in Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine, May 2002

Best French: Jacques Côté, Le Rouge idéal(Éditions Alire: Québec, 2002)

Best Juvenile/YA: Norah McClintock, Break and Enter (Scholastic Canada: Toronto, 2002)

Best Nonfiction: Andrew Mitrovica, Covert Entry (Random House Canada: Toronto, 2002)


2004

Best Novel: Giles Blunt, The Delicate Storm (Berkley, 2004)

Best First Novel: Jan Rehner, Just Murder (Sumach Press, 2003)

Best Nonfiction: Julian Sher and William Marsden, The Road to Hell (Knopf Canada, 2003)

Best Short Story: Gregory Ward, "Dead Wood", in Hard Boiled Love (Insomniac Press, 2003)

Best Juvenile: Graham McNamee, Acceleration (Random House, 2003)

Best French: Jean Lemieux, On finit toujours par payer (La Courte Echelle, 2003)



2005

Best Novel: Barbara Fradkin, Fifth Son (Napoleon and Co, 2004)

Best First Novel: Jon Evans, Dark Places (HarperPB, 2004)

Best Nonfiction: Matthew Hart, The Irish Game (Walker Books, 2004)

Best Short Story: Leslie Watts, "Crocodile Tears", in Revenge: A Noir Anthology (Insomniac Press, 2004)

Best Juvenile: Carrie Mac, The Beckoners (Orca Book Publishers, 2004)

Best French: Ann Lamontagne, Les douze pierres (Vents d'Ouest, 2004)

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The Crime Writers of Canada – How it all began

By Tony Aspler, founding President

In the summer of 1982 seven men with criminal intent met in Dooley’s bar, a suitably insalubrious downtown Toronto watering hole for what we had in mind. The co-conspirators were the late Derrick Murdoch, mystery reviewer for The Toronto Star, British novelist Tim Heald, book reviewer, the late Doug Marshall, editor John Pearce, authors Howard Engel, Larry Morse and myself. The noise in the establishment was such that we were driven out to the more lofty and salubrious surroundings of the rooftop bar in the Park Plaza.

The purpose of the meeting was to form an association of crime writers modeled on the Crime Writers of Great Britain. Although my genre at the time was political thrillers (I co-wrote three with Gordon Pape – ‘Chain Reaction’, ‘The Scorpion Sanction’ and ‘The Music Wars’) I was voted by default, to be the first President of the fledgling Crime Writers of Canada.

For the first year we met monthly in a room at the Toronto Reference Library, a fitting venue since it houses one of the world's foremost collections of library materials devoted to the life and works of Arthur Conan Doyle. At those early meetings we would invite an expert in different aspects of crime – cops, forensic scientists, criminal lawyers, etc. Eddie Greenspan was one of our guests whom we subsequently co-opted into presenting the Arthur Ellis Awards. These awards were named after the nom de travail of Canada’s hangmen. The wooden statuettes (a condemned man on a gibbet whose arms and legs flail when you pull a string – considered by some to be in execrable taste) were designed under the supervision of Tim Wynn-Jones, who subsequently retreated from the crime fold to write children’s books. (See note below)

The first recipient of the Arthur Ellis Award, in those days a single prize for the best novel published the previous year, was won by Eric Wright for ‘The Night The Gods Smiled,’ beating out works by William Deverell and Ted Wood. Next year it was Howard Engel for his second Benny Cooperman novel, ‘The Ransom Game.’ Both Eric and Howard would in turn ascend the throne of the Presidency of the Crime Writers of Canada. We used to publish a quarterly newsletter called ‘Fingerprints’ and the first item was the President’s letter, titled ‘Speech from the Throne.’

For my part, I returned to pure crime fiction with ‘Titanic’ and a series of Ezra Brant wine murder mysteries, ‘Blood Is Thicker Than Beaujolais’, ‘The Beast of Barbaresco’ and ‘Death on the Douro.’ I’m currently working on ‘Nightmare in Napa.’

A note on Arthur by Tim Wynn-Jones

I'm happy to clarify Arthur's history. It was my job to head the committee, as Tony said. And my big contribution, as far as I'm concerned, was in realizing that a book prize is kind of a stage prop. The darn thing should look good in somebody's hands as well as on their mantel. So I thought to go to a stage designer, Peter Blais, who happened also to be a wonderful actor, and who happened to be someone I had acted with and knew to have a wicked sense of humour. He got it! He understood what I was trying to say and came up with the jumping jack. So Peter very much deserves the kudos for Arthur and I'm just pleased to have got him on board. It's the best prize around, as far as I'm concerned. I'm lucky enough to have won one and also to have won an Edgar and Arthur beats Edgar all to heck!

CWC announces the Lou Allin Memorial Award of $200 for the Arthur Ellis Novella Category (April 2015)

Sponsored by the 2011 Bloody Words Conference Committee, this award will be given in honour of Lou Allin.  Lou was a board member of CWC, a co-chair of the 2011 Bloody Words Conference, an award-winning writer, and a mentor to many.  This award is particularly fitting, as she was the winner of the first Arthur Ellis Novella Award.  We miss you dearly, Lou.

Judging Process

Judging Process

 

Crime Writers of Canada recruits twenty-one volunteers from among the large body of award-winning writers, reviewers, booksellers, librarians, academics and avid crime fiction fans across Canada. The judges are not required to be CWC members, and many are not. The judges, therefore, represent a broad and knowledgeable cross-section of the reading public. Three judges read and evaluate the entries in each of the seven prize categories. Finalists in all categories are announced at Canada-wide Arthur Ellis Awards Shortlist Events late in April, and winners are announced at the annual Arthur Ellis Awards Gala in late May.

If you would like to volunteer as an Arthur Ellis Awards judge, please contact

 

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